See why The University of Alabama campus is recognized as one of the Most Beautiful Colleges in the South and Tuscaloosa has earned the reputation as one of the Top 30 College Towns in the nation.

Founded in 1831 as the state’s flagship university, The University of Alabama is steeped in tradition and success. Legends have been made in our academic halls, on our athletic fields and courts, and in our endeavors to shape a better world through our teaching, research and service. The University of Alabama has always focused on being the best. This is Where Legends Are Made.

Whether you’re planning a trip to tour campus or coming to town for a game, we look forward to welcoming you to Tuscaloosa and The University of Alabama campus. Our prominent campus is nationally renowned for its beauty, immaculate upkeep, award-winning student housing and first-class academic buildings and laboratories. And while our University is among the best in the nation, it’s not the only great thing about Tuscaloosa, Alabama, which USA Today ranked as one of the Top 30 college towns in America. The Druid City features a vibrant downtown with several music venues, art galleries and some of the best restaurants in the state. When you visit, you’ll quickly see there’s no place quite like Tuscaloosa.

Learn more about the University’s history through stopovers at noteworthy locations such as Malone-Hood Plaza, Autherine Lucy Hall, Manderson Landing, Denny Chimes, Bryant Museum, the Walk of Champions and Bryant-Denny Stadium. Other UA must-sees include our contemporary facilities, including Drummond Lyon Hall, Julia Tutwiler Hall, Hewson Hall and Stran-Hardin Arena. From tulips and cherry blossoms in the spring to golden leaves in the fall, a walk around campus is sure to impress.

Top Photo Spots on Campus

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Randall Welcome Center

Randall Welcome Center

Randall Welcome Center

Marr's Spring

Marr's Spring

Marr's Spring

Exterior view of Bryant-Denny Stadium

Bryant-Denny Stadium

Bryant-Denny Stadium

President's Mansion

President's Mansion

President's Mansion

Woods Quad

Woods Quad

Woods Quad

Autherine Lucy Clock Tower & Malone-Hood Plaza

Autherine Lucy Clock Tower & Malone-Hood Plaza

Autherine Lucy Clock Tower & Malone-Hood Plaza

Elephant topiary in front of Rose Administration Building

Rose Administration Building

Rose Administration Building

The University of Alabama Student Center

The University of Alabama Student Center

The University of Alabama Student Center

Dramatic night view at Manderson Landing

Manderson Landing

Manderson Landing

The Round House

The Round House

The Round House

Tuska Plaza

Tuska Plaza

Tuska Plaza

Peter Bryce Preserve

Peter Bryce Preserve

Peter Bryce Preserve

Denny Chimes & the Quad

Denny Chimes & the Quad

Denny Chimes & the Quad

Outdoor Campus Attractions

Where Legends Are Made banners adorn the poles framing the entrance to the Crimson Promenade.

Crimson Promenade

Dedicated in 2001 and recently renovated, the Crimson Promenade brick walkway celebrates the achievements of generations of UA students, alumni, leaders and friends. More than 18,000 personalized pavers are located adjacent to the Student Center.

High view in the endzone of Bryant-Denny Stadium.

Bryant-Denny Stadium

Bryant-Denny Stadium is not only one of the most iconic facilities on The University of Alabama campus, but it is also often one of the most visited destinations in the state. The current seating capacity of 100,077 makes Bryant-Denny Stadium one of the nation's largest on-campus football stadiums.

Statues of championship football coaches in the Walk of Champions outside the stadium.

Walk of Champions

The Walk of Champions, featuring relief tributes to UA’s championship football teams as well as statues of Bear Bryant, Nick Saban and other championship-winning football coaches, is outside Bryant-Denny Stadium. 

Students walking along the sidewalk on the Quad with Denny Chimes in the background.

Denny Chimes & the Quad

Located on the University’s Quad, the tower was named in honor of former University President George H. Denny. Completed in 1929, Denny Chimes offers carillon performances throughout the day. Outside the chimes, concrete blocks — the Walk of Fame — display handprints, footprints and names of UA football captains, including Joe Namath, DeVonta Smith, Derrick Henry and Bryce Young.

Autherine Lucy Clock Tower located on Malone-Hood Plaza with Foster Auditorium in the background.

Malone-Hood Plaza & Autherine Lucy Clock Tower

Outside Foster Auditorium stands the Malone-Hood Plaza and Autherine Lucy Clock Tower, which honor the three people who integrated The University of Alabama: Autherine Lucy, Vivian Malone and James Hood.  Built in 1939 and named for former UA President Richard Clarke Foster, Foster Auditorium is listed on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail. 

Entryway sign announcing the Park at Manderson Landing, surrounded by bushes and flowers.

Manderson Landing

The site of a former lock on the Black Warrior River, the Park at Manderson Landing features a paved walking trail along the river, picnic areas and UA Rowing’s boathouse. The site also features a stunning 30-foot statue of Minerva and a bicentennial timeline sculpture, both dedicated in December 2019.

Historical marker-style sign detailing the history of Marr's Spring with azaleas in bloom nearby and a glimpse of water on the side.

Marr's Spring

Tucked behind the Student Center lies Marr’s Spring, originally the University’s main water source. The area encompasses the spring and a man-made lake, both surrounded by a walking path, and multiple benches. It is a great spot to unwind or have a picnic.

Sidewalk running through green grass of Peter Bryce Preserve

Peter Bryce Preserve

The Peter Bryce Preserve, located on the east and west sides of Bryce Lawn Drive leading to Bryce Main, is 23 acres of green space that includes numerous beautiful trees, Adirondack chairs and benches for relaxing and a walking path. In March 2023, A Southern Magnolia tree located at the Bryce Preserve was recognized as an Alabama Champion Tree by the Alabama Forestry Commission for being the largest of that species in the state.

President's Mansion in the background with views of red azaleas in the foreground.

President's Mansion

The President’s Mansion was built originally in 1841 and survived the 1865 Civil War burning of the campus. The building serves as the private residence for the UA president. It also serves as a reception center for dignitaries and events hosted by the president, and is a favorite photo spot, especially for UA grads.

Fans taking photos by the Tuska statue outside of Bryant-Denny Stadium

Tuska Plaza

Tuska, a 19-foot-tall, seven-ton bronze elephant statue that resided at the NorthRiver Yacht Club for more than 20 years, was placed at the corner of University Boulevard and Wallace Wade Avenue in spring 2021. The bronze elephant statue is believed to be the largest of its kind in the world. The Tuska Plaza project included new landscaping, a large pedestal for Tuska to stand on, sidewalks surrounding the statue and lighting.

Rose Administration Building with the elephant topiary sitting out front.

Rose Administration Building

Noted for its unique elephant topiary, the Rose Administration building is named in honor of the 21st University president Frank Anthony Rose whose administration saw the successful integration of the campus, the glory days of Paul “Bear” Bryant, and the protection of student rights during the start of the Vietnam War. 

Closeup of Goldie in Woods Quad

Woods Quad

The original campus quadrangle built after the Civil War and the site of the first Alabama football game, Woods Quad now holds a Sculpture Garden. Currently, seven sculptures occupy the quad grounds, including Goldie, a robot lying on its side, which was forged at Sloss Furnaces in Birmingham. 

The Arts & Museums

A 60 ft skeleton of an ancient toothed whale called Basilosaurus cetoides inside the Alabama Museum of Natural History

Alabama Museum of Natural History

Located in Smith Hall, museum exhibits show off Alabama’s rich natural history, including fossil tracks, skulls and skeletons, a Basilosaurus cetoides — the state fossil of Alabama — and rocks and minerals. The museum hosts family-friendly events, as well as summer trips and camps.

Outside view of Gorgas House Museum

Gorgas House Museum

Built in 1829, the museum is the oldest structure on UA's campus and one of four buildings to survive the 1865 campus Civil War burning. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.

Items on display from a flintknapping demonstration held at Moundville.

Moundville Archaeological Park

On the Black Warrior River 13 miles south of Tuscaloosa, the park preserves massive flat-topped earthen pyramids, arranged around a vast central plaza. The park frequently hosts hands-on events, including the annual Native American Festival, which celebrates Native American culture through performers, vendors, demonstrators, living history teachers and more.

Artwork on display at the Paul R. Jones Museum

Paul R. Jones Museum

Located in downtown Tuscaloosa, the museum houses exhibits drawn from the Paul R. Jones Collection of American Art, one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of 20th-century African American art in the world. The museum also hosts lectures, concerts, workshops and theatre performances.

Visitors in front of the Wall of Honor just behind the bust of Paul W. Bryant

Paul W. Bryant Museum

Located on UA's campus, the museum exhibits artifacts and memorabilia that trace the long history of University of Alabama football. See Bear Bryant’s office, the Crystal Hat, the Tide Through Time timeline, as well as the new interactive Wall of Honor. There is also a merchandise store inside the museum. 

Exterior view of the Transportation Museum with red picnic tables outside

Warner Transportation Museum

Located on Queen City Avenue off Jack Warner Parkway, the museum features displays describing the development of Tuscaloosa as a transportation hub through its riverfront and, later, its railroad and highway connections. 

Exterior view of Garland Hall framed by pink azaleas

Sarah Moody Gallery of Art

Located in Garland Hall and part of the department of art and art history, the gallery has a schedule of art exhibits by contemporary artists as well as UA faculty and its permanent collection. 

Jonathan McReynolds performing at the Realizing the Dream concert

Frank Moody Music Building

The facility houses the School of Music and includes a concert hall that seats nearly 1,000. Events are held throughout the year, and a full calendar can be found at music.ua.edu/event.

Students perform Sweeney Todd

UA's Theatre District

Consisting of the Marian Gallaway Theatre and the Allen Bales Theatre in Rowand-Johnson Hall and the Dance Theatre across the street (in the English Building), UA’s Theatre District is located on Stadium Drive near the intersection of Marrs Spring Road, on the west end of campus. The theatre and dance department puts on several productions each semester. Tickets can be purchased at ua.universitytickets.com.

Other Areas of Interest

Students in the immersive experience of the Randall Welcome Center.

Catherine and Pettus Randall Welcome Center

The Catherine and Pettus Randall Welcome Center provides an immersive exploration of the Alabama experience. With multiple galleries, two theaters, a lounge and a reception area, the Randall Welcome Center is filled with information, photos, videos and artifacts highlighting both UA’s rich history and current campus opportunities. The Center is open to the public during normal UA business hours, and the Office of Undergraduate Admissions offers tours for prospective students and their families. Schedule an official campus tour at visit.ua.edu.

Exterior view of the Alabama Adapted Athletics building.

Adapted Athletics Facility

The first of its kind in the nation, Alabama’s Adapted Athletics facility includes the Stran-Hardin Arena, host site for men’s and women’s wheelchair basketball games. UA also sponsors competitive wheelchair tennis and track.

Artistic bronze sign noting University of Alabama Arboretum.

UA Arboretum

About six miles from the heart of campus, the Arboretum features walking trails through a native woodland, a wildflower garden, ornamental plants, an experimental garden, an outdoor stage and a children’s garden.

Front exterior view of Autherine Lucy Hall framed by trees and other green landscaping.

Autherine Lucy Hall

Home to the College of Education, Autherine Lucy Hall was dedicated on February 25, 2022, to recognize Dr. Autherine Lucy Foster’s courage in creating the opportunity for all races to attend the University. In front of the building stands a historical marker to the civil rights hero, which was dedicated on September 15, 2017.

Exterior shot from across the street of The Corner building that houses Starbucks and the Supe Store.

The Corner

A popular destination for students and visitors, The Corner on Bryant Drive is home to a Starbucks location that includes a drive-thru as well as the Supe Store, featuring the latest in UA apparel and merchandise.

Exterior photo of Gorgas Library with trees in bloom and a campus tour group at the front steps.

Gorgas Library

Named for Amelia Gayle Gorgas, the first female UA librarian, this was the first academic building on campus named for a female. The library has several rotating exhibits a year in the Pearce Foyer and features the A.S. Williams III Americana Collection.

Exterior view of Gallalee Hall with rooftop Observatory framed by tree branches.

Observatory

Located on the rooftop of Gallalee Hall, the observatory offers monthly Public Nights for astronomical viewing.

A student wearing shorts and a t-shirt is climbing the climbing wall inside the Rec Center.

Recreation Center

The Student Recreation Center features a large cardio area with equipment; weight room and group exercise studios; lap pool and outdoor pool complex; basketball, racquetball and tennis courts; and a climbing wall.

Exterior view of the Round House with the historical marker to the left of the house.

Round House

Built in Gothic revival style in 1860, the Round House served as a guardhouse during the University’s days as a military school and is now a memorial to all UA honor societies. It can be viewed and photographed from the outside; no entrance is allowed.

Exterior view of the Student Center framed by Where Legends Are Made pole banners.

UA Student Center

The UA Student Center contains a theatre, ballroom, conference rooms, offices for student government and student-related activities, Starbucks, a food court and the Supe Store.

Tuscaloosa, or “T-Town” as it is affectionately referred to, has become one of Alabama’s most vibrant cities, offering visitors countless possibilities for dining, shopping, outdoor adventures, nightlife, cultural events and more. Named one of the Most Livable Cities in America, Tuscaloosa is more than just a college town with a storied gridiron tradition. 

A wakeboarder in mid-air at the lake.

A city of about 100,000 people, Tuscaloosa rises to the occasion on fall Saturdays when the population more than doubles to champion the Crimson Tide at Bryant-Denny Stadium. Situated along the banks of the Black Warrior River in west-central Alabama, the city lies about an hour southwest of Birmingham. It’s within a few hours’ drive of Gulf Coast beaches and the major cities of Nashville, New Orleans, Memphis and Atlanta, making it a great base for growing better acquainted with the South’s finest offerings.

Exterior view of the pavilion located on the Riverwalk.

When it’s time to unwind from the hustle of the day, Tuscaloosa provides residents and visitors the spaces to relax, explore and have fun. The area offers a wide range of outdoor spaces highlighting Alabama’s natural beauty. Anglers, climbers, hikers and water enthusiasts will find themselves at some of the world’s premier venues for their interests and hobbies right here in town, or within a short drive.

Packed crowd attending a concert at the Tuscaloosa Amphitheater.
Patrons and vendors mingle at the Farmers Market.